Published On: Thu, May 9th, 2019

What is the maximum state pension? How can you claim as much as possible?


The state pension is given to all Britons when they reach state pension age, provided they have paid enough national insurance.

National insurance is paid like a tax, taken from your salary, or can be paid voluntarily.

How much a person gets in their state pension can vary, but there is a set maximum amount.

So, how much is the maximum state pension amount?

The full new state pension is £168.60 per week.

However, you could get more if you have additional state pension or you defer your payments.

The government website states: “The additional state pension is an extra amount of money you could get on top of your basic state pension if you’re a man born before 6 April 1951 or a woman born before 6 April 1953.”

How can delaying your state pension boost your payments?

Experts at PensionBee told Express.co.uk: “Delaying your state pension by just a few weeks could result in you receiving a higher weekly state pension amount, or even a lump-sum payment. The amount you’ll qualify for depends on when you reach state pension age.

If you reached state pension age before 6 April 2016

Your state pension will increase by around 1 per cent for every 5 weeks you defer, totalling 10.4 per cent for every full year. For 2018/19, the basic state pension is £125.95 a week or £6,549.40 a year. If you delay taking your pension for just one year your state pension will rise to £139.05 a week, or £7,230.60 a year.

If you reached state pension age before 6 April 2016 you could qualify for a lump sum payment if you defer claiming your state pension for a minimum of 12 months. That means you could take a lump sum of around £6,713 (including interest of 2 per cent above the Bank of England base rate), when you defer the basic state pension of £125.95 a week for a year.

If you reached state pension age after 6 April 2016

If you’ve reached state pension age relatively recently, you’ll see less of an increase as the new state pension is already higher than the basic state pension amount referenced above. Your state pension will increase by around 1 per cent for every 9 weeks you defer, totalling 5.8 per cent for every full year.

If you receive the new state pension of £164.35 a week or £8,546.20 a year in 2018/19, your pension will rise to £173.89 a week, or £9,041.88 a year when you defer taking your pension for a year.

If you receive housing benefit or pension credit, it’s worth noting that these benefits may be affected by any additional pension income. But, if you qualify for a lump-sum payment your benefits won’t be affected.

There have been claims the triple lock, which sees the state pension amount rise each year, should be scrapped. What would this mean for UK pensions?

The state pension triple lock was brought in as of 2010. It means the state pension will rise every year by a certain amount, dictated by one of three things – the rate of inflation for September of the previous year, the increase in average earnings, or 2.5 per cent.

It increases to match whichever is highest.

State pension age has risen in the UK, so how much will you get now?

The next significant date in terms of these rises is expected to be July 6 this year. 



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